Tag Archives: imitation

Squirt

I haven’t blogged for some time, partly because we’ve been going through a difficult patch. As often happens when the seasons change, Henry’s behaviour has become more challenging. The arrival of the hot weather, a source of joy for most of us, seems to make him agitated and moody. It’s partly physical – a reaction to pollen and humidity – and partly, I think, just a response to change: in temperature, in light levels, in the clocks. So it was lovely today, after what seems like weeks of being told to ‘stop’ and ‘go away’ whenever I suggest an activity, to have some fun in the sunshine with a hose. The video below is terrible in terms of quality – my camera is filming everything with a black and white background and I can’t work out how to flip the footage to the horizontal, but if you don’t mind watching it with your head at ninety degrees, you can see how much fun he’s having. In terms of language, it also shows how quickly he can now pick up a word for something he wants and how hard he tries to pronounce the difficult combination of sounds.

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Summer term

First days are always difficult. Henry has spent the whole of the Easter holidays doing more or less what he likes and any sense of routine has been pretty well absent. But this first day has been made much easier by the arrival of a visitor we haven’t seen much of recently – the sun. Being trapped inside by rain, wind and cold for much of the last five months has been depressing, but it has also deprived Henry of one of his most important sensory activities: trampolining. Of course it’s possible to trampoline in winter, but he hates the dead leaves, the dirt, the pools of water that collect under the surround and ambush your feet as you jump. He’s a fair weather bouncer and so this weekend has been the first time he’s been on in months. Today we spent a long time on the trampoline together and I remembered why I love it. Henry managed to imitate a sequence of actions (clap, touch knees, turn around, seat drop) that he would find difficult on ‘dry land’. He’s been struggling with the speech therapy pronunication exercises we’ve been given – consonant blends with ‘s’ and three syllabled words – but ‘sneeze’, ‘snow’ and ‘snore’ came out perfectly while bouncing and saying ‘tram-po-line’ with a jump on each syllable seems to help his articulation too, as well as being a lot more fun than simply repeating it. Eye contact and engagement were great and we had lots of spontaneous speech as well as the ‘drills’ – ‘Mummy sit’, ‘jump high’, ‘lie down’ (I needed that one) and ‘get out’ (when the cat had the temerity to try to join in).

The sensory feedback Henry gets from this type of activity is described by occupational therapists as ‘proprioceptive’ and ‘vestibular’. Proprioception governs motor control and posture and works with the vestibular system, which keeps the body balanced. Together they provide a sense of where the body is in space, an orientation of oneself in relation to the world. Trampolining, which requires constant adjustments of balance, posture and muscular effort in order to stay upright and bounce rhythmically, is a brilliant way to get these systems working in harmony, enabling my son, who cannot jump off a chair, climb a ladder or balance on a beam without support, to do the most effortless and graceful seat drops. As I’ve written before (Hammock, November 2012) being physically regulated also seems to help organise his brain, including the speech centres. And it also makes him very happy and calm. We went into town in the afternoon and he queued patiently behind two people in Next, managed to walk out of a charity shop without melting down because they didn’t have any DVDs he wanted and, having pointed at a Twirl bar in Smiths that was well within grab-unwrap-and-stuff-into-mouth-in-seconds range, accepted without complaint that he couldn’t have it ( I’m not mean; he’s allergic to dairy). Summer, I love you. Please don’t go away.

Talking

We had a visit from a new speech therapist last week. One of the purposes of her visit was to assess Henry for an AAC device (an electronic talker). It’s something we’ve been considering for a while, ever since a friend of mine started blogging about her son’s amazing progress using a device called a Vantage Lite, which uses a system called LAMP (Language Acquisition Through Motor Planning). Even though Henry has some speech, there are a number of  reasons why he might benefit from such a device: it could make his speech clearer to others, help him with word retrieval and possibly also help him to sequence  words into longer phrases and sentences.

Henry was on talkative form that day, grabbing the speech therapist’s hand as soon as she came through the door, pulling her into the sitting room and demanding tickles and ‘fast running’. She was obviously quite surprised, saying at one point that she had ‘ been expecting a non-verbal child ‘ and commenting positively about his intonation, imitation skills and obvious desire to communicate. For someone whose child had been described by one teacher at school as having ‘no functional language’ you can imagine this was music to my ears. Her advice was to delay a decision about an AAC device for six months, as she felt Henry may be on the verge of a ‘language explosion’ ( more music, a full symphony orchestra this time). We agreed that there are barriers that he has to overcome: difficulties with word retrieval, some consonant blends and sequencing (syllables and words) but that the main hurdle of old, his motivation to speak, is gradually being overcome by Intensive Interaction. I’ve written before about how his speech is confined to requests, but II is helping to extend those requests and also seems to be encouraging him to comment. We’ve had many repeats of the descriptive  ‘noisy’ I wrote about a few weeks ago and we now also get a running commentary at meal times – ‘chips….drink….sausage….chips’. When he started doing this we responded with a slightly irritated  ‘yes, look, your chips are there’, assuming that he was requesting as usual, but quickly realised that he was telling us, not asking. We now say ‘ Mmm chips, yummy’ and he repeats ‘yummy’ and carries on tucking in.

The speech therapist gave us some ideas for how to further extend Henry’s vocabulary and length of utterance within his narrow range of interests. Some of it we already knew, but had become lazy about: not letting him get away with using ‘toast’ to mean both toast and bread, insisting on the phrase ‘I want X please’ instead of just running to fulfil his single barked commands. Other ideas we had never used, for example, the use of scripts to accompany favourite games and other requests, the labeling (with a named picture) of items around the house. She advised us to ban questions that demand unmastered vocabulary as much as possible, concentrating on giving choices instead.  ‘Is this a sofa or a chair?’ is much easier to answer than ‘What’s this?’  as the correct word can be picked, rather than dredged up from memory (when his most frequent response was not ‘sofa’ but  ‘so far away’ !) Above all, she affirmed the growing confidence I’ve been feeling about Henry’s verbal potential.  The motivation to speak is now there, and we need to work as hard as possible on giving him the tools and the practice he needs to do it.

The video below shows Ellie working on a number of scripts with Henry, attempting to turn ‘blanket’ into ‘come under the blanket’, ‘ noisy’ into ‘Ellie, be noisy’ and ‘tickle tummy’ into ‘I want you to tickle my tummy’ (we’ve since changed this to ‘ tickle my tummy please’). She does this by modelling the phrase, then giving a prompt. It’s early days, but he’s definitely getting there. Happy Christmas everyone.